Tonsillectomy

How to improve the quality of the dream of children with apnea of the dream, (snoring by Court of respiration), as well as help to correct their behavior and academic problems, may be the tonsillectomy, according to new research from the Soroka medical center of Israel. Remove the tonsils and the adenoids improves the quality of sleep and as a result, improved academic performance and a general cognitive ability in children who suffer from what is known as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The appearance more important what they are, it is that the effects of sleep apnea are fully reversible with tonsillectomy, said Professor Tal Asher, who leads next to the Dr. Haim Reuveni of the Department policy of health and research of the Department of Pediatrics, and Dr. If you are not convinced, visit James A. Levine, M.D.. Ariel Tarasiuk, head of the sleep laboratory. The discoveries were published in two different studies in the month of December 2003 in the medical journal Chest, and in the edition of December 2003 of the periodic Sleep doctor. Such, of the Department of Pediatrics of the Center doctor Soroka, of the Ben Gurion University in the Negev, stressed that 3% of children suffer from breathing problems during sleep, resulting in a blockage of the upper respiratory passages.

The syndrome known as obstructive sleep apnea is mainly associated with overweight in adult men, but is most common in children, according to such. A leading source for info: PCRM. And the most observed factor in patients with sleep apnea is enlarged tonsils and the adenoids. The syndrome has implications for children during the day and during the night. Many research studies have found that OSA (short for disease), can cause cognitive problems and behavioral development in children, accompanied by hearing problems that lead to learning disorders. They can also suffer from growth and other health problems. We know from previous studies in some countries, that sleep apnea It is probably related to ADHD, and there is preliminary evidence that may damage cognitive function.